Joe Gutierrez

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FGMC lost another long-term key member as Joe Gutierrez passed away on March 6 at the age of 91.  Joe was also a Vulcan geologist for many years and served as the liaison between Vulcan and the club. Joe was also instrumental in getting the geology museum established at Vulcan Quarry and let many school classes, scouts, and other youth groups through the facility. The museum was named for him and his efforts in community relations and education.

Joe’s health has limited his attendance for the last couple of years, but when he could make it he was always smiling and willing to teach anyone with any interest about rocks.

He will be greatly missed.

 

Dick Hartz

It is with great sadness that we report the passing of Dick Hartz.

Dick has been a long-time member and fixture of the club.  He served as treasurer for many years.  He was always active at the club show and could often be found on field trips.

Dick at the 2015 show
Dick at work at the 2015 show – courtesy Alex McGilvary

He will be greatly missed by all.

 

January Meeting – Cancelled

Due to the weather conditions (6-7 inch snow, or more) and likely not a lot of clearing on Thursday, the January 2018 meeting is cancelled.  We’ll try to pick things back up again next month.

(And, no, this does not mean an extension for paying dues – if you can’t make the February meeting you can still mail it in.)

 

January Newsletter is up

The January 2018 newsletter has been posted on the newsletter page.

The meeting will be Thursday, Jan 18, at 7:30 PM.

The January presentation will be given by Phil Bradley of the NC geological Survey. Phil has spoken tour club before, and was warmly received. His topic will be, “The Geology of Haw River” (the HAW River is a 110 mile long tributary of the Cape Fear River in Central North Carolina).

Forsyth County Corundum

Ron Carswell recently sent in an email with a article about Forsyth County Corundum.  From his email:

Thought I would share a little information about local Forsyth County geology that I have been investigating for many years as an archaeology enthusiast. Many prehistoric rock quarries existed in the now Forsyth County and Yadkin County areas that I have studied. The quarry efforts by early Prehistoric people impacted these geological environments extensively but clues have been left that identify  the geological events that supplied rock materials used for stone tools and components. Hope you can identify this as a positive scientific effort in a geo archaeological nature. I have max amounts of data and artifacts on this subject.

Thanks,

Ron Carswell

rjcarswell@yadtel.net

For the article itself:  Forsyth County Corundum